Posts

  • Hiding Craze Lines on Your Teeth—Can Bonding Help?

    As teeth age, they often show signs of crazing. When this happens, tiny cracks or lines appear on the surface of a tooth. Typically, craze lines only sit on your enamel and won't deepen or get worse, so they don't need any treatment. Over time, however, you may start to notice your crazing more, and it may make you self-conscious about the way your teeth look to other people. Bonding treatments may be a solution — how can they help? [Read More]

  • 3 Tips for Maintaining an Even Smile After Braces

    Dental braces can help to move crooked or twisted teeth into a more even alignment. However, after your dentist removes the braces, your teeth can begin to move back into an uneven alignment, undoing all the good work of your orthodontic treatment. Here are three things you can do to maintain the straightening effects of your braces after they are removed. 1. Wear Your Retainer Sometimes, orthodontists will provide you with a retainer to wear after your wire and bracket braces are removed. [Read More]

  • Sticky Orthodontic Problems: How to Get Chewing Gum Off Your Child's Braces

    Even though your children's orthodontist is likely to have told your child not to chew gum while wearing braces, your child may sneak a bit of gum every now and then. If your kid is unlucky, then gum may end up stuck to their braces or wires. This can be tricky, but not impossible, to clean off. After having a quick rant at your kid about chewing gum illicitly in the first place, try the following fixes: [Read More]

  • Diabetes and Dental Implants: Are Subperiosteal Implants Better Than Bone Grafts?

    Replacing a missing tooth with a dental implant is often straightforward. Your dentist will insert a post into your bone and, once this post is embedded in place, will then add a false tooth to it. In some cases, however, this kind of implant technique won't work. For example, if you have suffered from some bone loss in the implant area, then you won't have enough bone to hold the post securely. [Read More]

  • So You Have A Broken Tooth: What Choices Do You Have?

    One of the worst feelings you can have in your mouth is the discovery of a broken tooth. While your feelings turn to panic about the potential amount of damage done, your tongue starts to involuntarily poke at the breakage until your feelings of panic change to annoyance. As someone who has never had a broken tooth before, you are wondering what your options are to repair it. The answer to that question depends on which tooth is broken, and the extent of the damage. [Read More]

  • Rooting for Baby Teeth: What Happens to the Roots of Baby Teeth?

    When baby teeth fall out naturally, they appear to be hollow. This gives the impression that they don't have roots or that the root is still inside the gum. Much like permanent teeth, baby teeth do have roots. However, as long as a baby, or deciduous, tooth comes out the way nature intended, most, if not all, of its root will be missing. The Body Absorbs Baby Teeth Roots From around the age of five or six years old, children begin to shed their baby teeth. [Read More]

  • Why Should You Use a Flouride Toothpaste?

    If you've ever looked closely at your toothpaste, you might have noticed that most contain fluoride. This is a natural mineral abundant in the earth's crust and seen in nature all across the world, and it can do your teeth the world of good. There are a few toothpastes that don't use fluoride, but here's why you should avoid them and pick up a fluoride toothpaste instead. Fluoride Helps Teeth Develop   [Read More]

  • Tooth Hurty: Time to See the Dentist

    Few people enjoy a visit to the dentist, but ignoring your dental health can have serious consequences. Dentists recommend regular check-ups, but what if you've left it even longer? How do you tell it really is time to see the dentist? Toothache. The most obvious of all signs a dental visit is long overdue, a toothache is your body's way of telling you something's amiss. Toothaches are often caused by cavities and can also be evidence of an infection, grinding your teeth, having a misaligned bite or gum disease. [Read More]

  • A Short Guide to Periodontal Disease

    Gum disease, also known as periodontal disease, is probably the most common dental problem in the world. The mildest form of gum disease is known as gingivitis, which is characterised by red, sore gums, but can usually be reversed with a good oral hygiene routine. If left unchecked, gingivitis can develop into periodontitis, a more severe condition that can lead to tooth loss. This short guide explains how to find out if you have gum disease, how you can reverse the condition yourself, and what your dentist can do to help. [Read More]

  • After a Root Canal: 4 Things You Need to Know

    A root canal can be necessary to head off a larger problem further along the line. It involves the removal of the dental pulp, followed by reinforcement of the tooth (generally with a dental crown).The thought of having an actual nerve removed might sound somewhat daunting, but it's a very straightforward procedure. It can be even more straightforward if you know how to take care of the site in the days following the procedure. [Read More]