dentist

  • So You Have A Broken Tooth: What Choices Do You Have?

    One of the worst feelings you can have in your mouth is the discovery of a broken tooth. While your feelings turn to panic about the potential amount of damage done, your tongue starts to involuntarily poke at the breakage until your feelings of panic change to annoyance. As someone who has never had a broken tooth before, you are wondering what your options are to repair it. The answer to that question depends on which tooth is broken, and the extent of the damage. [Read More]

  • Rooting for Baby Teeth: What Happens to the Roots of Baby Teeth?

    When baby teeth fall out naturally, they appear to be hollow. This gives the impression that they don't have roots or that the root is still inside the gum. Much like permanent teeth, baby teeth do have roots. However, as long as a baby, or deciduous, tooth comes out the way nature intended, most, if not all, of its root will be missing. The Body Absorbs Baby Teeth Roots From around the age of five or six years old, children begin to shed their baby teeth. [Read More]

  • Why Should You Use a Flouride Toothpaste?

    If you've ever looked closely at your toothpaste, you might have noticed that most contain fluoride. This is a natural mineral abundant in the earth's crust and seen in nature all across the world, and it can do your teeth the world of good. There are a few toothpastes that don't use fluoride, but here's why you should avoid them and pick up a fluoride toothpaste instead. Fluoride Helps Teeth Develop   [Read More]

  • Tooth Hurty: Time to See the Dentist

    Few people enjoy a visit to the dentist, but ignoring your dental health can have serious consequences. Dentists recommend regular check-ups, but what if you've left it even longer? How do you tell it really is time to see the dentist? Toothache. The most obvious of all signs a dental visit is long overdue, a toothache is your body's way of telling you something's amiss. Toothaches are often caused by cavities and can also be evidence of an infection, grinding your teeth, having a misaligned bite or gum disease. [Read More]

  • A Short Guide to Periodontal Disease

    Gum disease, also known as periodontal disease, is probably the most common dental problem in the world. The mildest form of gum disease is known as gingivitis, which is characterised by red, sore gums, but can usually be reversed with a good oral hygiene routine. If left unchecked, gingivitis can develop into periodontitis, a more severe condition that can lead to tooth loss. This short guide explains how to find out if you have gum disease, how you can reverse the condition yourself, and what your dentist can do to help. [Read More]

  • After a Root Canal: 4 Things You Need to Know

    A root canal can be necessary to head off a larger problem further along the line. It involves the removal of the dental pulp, followed by reinforcement of the tooth (generally with a dental crown).The thought of having an actual nerve removed might sound somewhat daunting, but it's a very straightforward procedure. It can be even more straightforward if you know how to take care of the site in the days following the procedure. [Read More]

  • What You Should Know About Dental Sealants

    You can reduce your chance of developing tooth decay by using dental sealants. Below are some major aspects of dental sealants that you need to know. Use this information to decide whether or not you should have the sealants placed on your teeth. What They Are Dental sealants are thin coats of materials, such as plastics, which are placed on the molars. These prevent the accumulation of bacteria or pieces of food on the teeth. [Read More]

  • Partial to an Additional Tooth: Could I Add Another Tooth to My Partial Denture?

    Getting a partial denture with one or two teeth is a fast and inexpensive way to ensure your smile doesn't suffer in the absence of a tooth or two. However, according to statistics, adults between the ages of 20 to 64 have an average of 24.92 remaining teeth. That means that no matter what age you are, it is likely that you could lose at least one or more teeth in the future. [Read More]

  • Dental Services That a General Dentist Can Provide to Your Family Members

    Some friends come and go, but family is here to stay. For the most part, family are the people that share in your happiness, but also help you get through difficult times. It is important to ensure your family has a clean bill of health, as they are your blood and support system, filling your life with positivity when you need it. Many of the dental problems that affect different family members, from children to the elderly, are actually preventable. [Read More]

  • Dental Implants: What You Need to Know About Temporary Dental Crowns

    The length of time necessary for each stage of a dental implant will vary from patient to patient. The tooth that is to be replaced might need to be removed before the actual implant (a metal bolt) can be inserted into your jawbone. You will then generally need to wait for osseointegration to take place, wherein your jawbone will fuse around the implant to secure it into place. Once this has occurred, an abutment can be fitted to the top of the implant before a specially fabricated dental prosthesis is permanently attached, thus completing the dental implant. [Read More]